When I moved to Revelstoke a decade ago, the arts scene was very different, and certainly not as robust as it is today. There was no Revelstoke Performing Arts Centre, no Art First! gallery, and no comedy scene, to name a few. On an average weekend, there were a couple of live bands in town; now, that’s more like a Tuesday night in winter. There was a smattering of photographers and videographers, but the digital tools that have allowed them push the story of Revelstoke’s backcountry culture out to the world were still nascent.

Some things remain the same: both then and now, the arts scene was and is driven by a core group of dedicated volunteers doing the often unheralded hard work behind the scenes to maintain the many programs and facilities that we enjoy, including galleries, youth programming, monthly shows, diverse artists’ facilities, and touring arts performances. The Revelstoke Arts Council (RAC) does so much with often very little to provide a strong foundation for the arts in the community.

The Roxy Theatre featured large projections. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer

But, if you listened to the murmurs, there were persistent complaints of a disconnect. Revelstoke has experienced a big youth movement in the past decade. A recent housing study highlighted the comparatively large and growing new twenty-something demographic. From the artists among them, there were complaints their new forms of expression somehow didn’t fit into the existing programming. For their crafts, arts and other works, they sought an ongoing social connection with the community, which wasn’t best realized in a formal setting. They wanted more interaction and feedback, and often gravitated to the local farm and craft market scene to get that connection.

Over the past few years especially, this has really began to shift, as newcomers to the community have integrated into the organized arts scene, realizing that the opportunity to shape the scene was right there. All you needed to do was get involved and put your shoulder into it to shape the community to your vision.

Rob Buchanan, Jessica Leahey, Greg Hoffart converted the Grizzly Plaza bandshell into a plastic and wood tetrahedron fish bowl complete with fishes, coral, a submarine, and other ocean inhabitants. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer

What the LUNA Nocturnal Art & Wonder fest has achieved in its second year is a synthesis of artistic expression that reflects what a youthful community wants to see in a big art festival: thousands of people coming together for an inclusive art party for everyone. It’s a chance to be social and expressive at the same time.

I chatted with a few attendees on Sunday morning, and the consensus was the 2018 LUNA was a blast. It had something for the kids, something for the late-night partiers, and everyone in between.

Congratulations to the RAC, the LUNA core team of Victoria Strange, Miriam Manley, Rob Buchanan, Jana Thompson, Izzy Lynch and the dozens of volunteers for pulling off another great festival. LUNA fits Revelstoke like a custom-fit ski boot liner and will be welcomed as an annual highlight in the years to come.

For details on the show, please see the captions in the photos below.

The crowd, including lots of kids, descend on the festival at dusk. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
99 Red Balloons by Stephane Riendeau transformed a DJ booth into a disco ball and balloon adorned party space on Mackenzie Avenue. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Taryn Walker’s large-scale abstract painting on the Revelstoke United Church. Its line drawings meditated on the cycle of birth, life, destruction and death. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Linda Dickson and Begbie View Elementary students created a path of fish suspended on metal rods, with the sounds of babbling brooks and children’s laughter piped in. At the McCarty House lawn. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Linda Dickson and Begbie View Elementary students created a path of fish suspended on metal rods, with the sounds of babbling brooks and children’s laughter piped in. At the McCarty House lawn. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Linda Dickson and Begbie View Elementary students created a path of fish suspended on metal rods, with the sounds of babbling brooks and children’s laughter piped in. At the McCarty House lawn. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Zusana Riha’s amazing bear and caribou sculptures were made from recycled materials. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Zusana Riha’s amazing bear and caribou sculptures were made from recycled materials. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Zusana Riha’s amazing bear and caribou sculptures were made from recycled materials. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Zusana Riha’s amazing bear and caribou sculptures were made from recycled materials. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The event included live graffiti art display on Mackenzie Avenue. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Local arts dynamo Rob Buchanan participated in several works for the exhibit, including Powtine, a representation of the ubiquitous french fry box, but filled with fries made from old skis. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The Bicycle Arch by Trent Kappler featured about a dozen bikes welded together and adorned with lighting. When you turned the pedal, the whole machine moved.
Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The Bicycle Arch by Trent Kappler featured about a dozen bikes welded together and adorned with lighting. When you turned the pedal, the whole machine moved.
Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The Bicycle Arch by Trent Kappler featured about a dozen bikes welded together and adorned with lighting. When you turned the pedal, the whole machine moved.
Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Sarah J. Spurr’s The Space Between was tucked away in the Chubby Funsters courtyard. The kinetic sculpture featured a moving raven soaring above a wildfire made of paper mache Indian paintbrush flowers. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Sarah J. Spurr’s The Space Between was tucked away in the Chubby Funsters courtyard. The kinetic sculpture featured a moving raven soaring above a wildfire made of paper mache Indian paintbrush flowers. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
In the Circle in the Chubby Funsters courtyard was a large interactive sculpture that reacted to the sound and vibrations of the passing children. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Rob Buchanan, Jessica Leahey, Greg Hoffart converted the Grizzly Plaza bandshell into a plastic and wood tetrahedron fish bowl complete with fishes, coral, a submarine, and other ocean inhabitants. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Rob Buchanan, Jessica Leahey, Greg Hoffart converted the Grizzly Plaza bandshell into a plastic and wood tetrahedron fish bowl complete with fishes, coral, a submarine, and other ocean inhabitants. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The Roxy Theatre featured large projections. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The Roxy Theatre featured large projections. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The Roxy Theatre featured large projections. At left, Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The Dream Machine by Kate Shea and Claudia Bambi featured a massive wooden brain structure with two bicycles inside. When you pedaled the bikes, the brain lit up. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The LUNA team and the Revelstoke Cycling Asociation teamed up to bring back the Powder Slug, giving attendees a ride around the venue. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The LUNA team and the Revelstoke Cycling Asociation teamed up to bring back the Powder Slug, giving attendees a ride around the venue. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The LUNA team and the Revelstoke Cycling Asociation teamed up to bring back the Powder Slug, giving attendees a ride around the venue. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The Revelstoke Communtiy Band repurposed the city hall steps into a natural amphitheatre. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The event included live graffiti art display on Mackenzie Avenue. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Hayley MacIntyre’s Anthropocene adorned the Castle Joe’s Books hideaway courtyard just off Mackenzie Avenue. The work was a representation of the our current geological era, where human activity, such as our prolific throw-away culture, is defining the epoch on a global scale. The composition was made entirely of disposable materials, like Tim Hortons cups, and sought to force the viewer to consider the consequences of the trash our disposable culture creates by making them consider it. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Hayley MacIntyre’s Anthropocene adorned the Castle Joe’s Books hideaway courtyard just off Mackenzie Avenue. The work was a representation of the our current geological era, where human activity, such as our prolific throw-away culture, is defining the epoch on a global scale. The composition was made entirely of disposable materials, like Tim Hortons cups, and sought to force the viewer to consider the consequences of the trash our disposable culture creates by making them consider it. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Allison Raven and Amanda Quinlan’s Mix It Up created a life sized spinning mix and match toy decorated with animals and people. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Lucie Bergeron’s Octopus hung in the alleyway behind the Explorer’s Society Hotel. The octopus and its electric friends appeared to dance as the lights flickered. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Lucie Bergeron’s Octopus hung in the alleyway behind the Explorer’s Society Hotel. The octopus and its electric friends appeared to dance as the lights flickered. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Cris Derksen is a two-spirit Juno Award–nominated Canadian Indigenous cellist from Northern Alberta. Her set combined her unique musical direction with traditional Indigenous music. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Nicolas Houle’s Birds Doing Human Things was featured in a natural alleyway cage off Mackenzie Avenue. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Nicolas Houle’s Birds Doing Human Things was featured in a natural alleyway cage off Mackenzie Avenue. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The LUNA VOX by Claire Sieber and Nicola McGarry, with help from JM LaFlamme was an interactive piece that captured the expression of the audience. A small photo booth in the alley behind the Roxy Theatre recorded participants’ action on video, then projected them into the audience in the theatre. The commentary focused on the world’s state of environmental decline and ways to move towards a better path. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
The LUNA VOX by Claire Sieber and Nicola McGarry, with help from JM LaFlamme was an interactive piece that captured the expression of the audience. A small photo booth in the alley behind the Roxy Theatre recorded participants’ action on video, then projected them into the audience in the theatre. The commentary focused on the world’s state of environmental decline and ways to move towards a better path. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Aislin Buchanan & Cathy English created LUNA Web, a whimsical spider web made from colourful string. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Local kids were drawn to Falling Awake, an hour long surrealist theatre performance by RAGMOP inside the River City Pub pool room. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Local kids were drawn to Falling Awake, an hour long surrealist theatre performance by RAGMOP inside the River City Pub pool room. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Sylvan Solace by Jess Leahey, Rob Buchanan, and Greg Hoffart was inspired by the infinity room concept, and featured sonotubes painted to look like birch trees, with light and endless mirrors cultivating a mystical feeling. The exhibit also allowed visitors into a hidden downtown courtyard that most didn’t know was there. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Sylvan Solace by Jess Leahey, Rob Buchanan, and Greg Hoffart was inspired by the infinity room concept, and featured sonotubes painted to look like birch trees, with light and endless mirrors cultivating a mystical feeling. The exhibit also allowed visitors into a hidden downtown courtyard that most didn’t know was there. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Sylvan Solace by Jess Leahey, Rob Buchanan, and Greg Hoffart was inspired by the infinity room concept, and featured sonotubes painted to look like birch trees, with light and endless mirrors cultivating a mystical feeling. The exhibit also allowed visitors into a hidden downtown courtyard that most didn’t know was there. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Sylvan Solace by Jess Leahey, Rob Buchanan, and Greg Hoffart was inspired by the infinity room concept, and featured sonotubes painted to look like birch trees, with light and endless mirrors cultivating a mystical feeling. The exhibit also allowed visitors into a hidden downtown courtyard that most didn’t know was there. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Revlstoke sculptor Louis-Marc Simard’s The Muse featured an abstract fibreglass statue of a woman. It represented the additional burden that women bear in the universe.
The Graffiti Mural by Kris Kupsay (AKA KUPS) now adorns the Monashee Distillery wall. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Inside Monashee Distillery. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Simon Wex, Rob Buchanan and Rob Parkin’s Oops I Hit Something featured spinning LED rope simulating swirling electricity or water. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
SiFi a.k.a. Simon Hunt, combines live drumming in his DJ sets. He played with various local musicians near the beer garden. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
SiFi a.k.a. Simon Hunt, combines live drumming in his DJ sets. He played with various local musicians near the beer garden. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer
Aaron Orlando
Aaron Orlando is the Creative Director of revelstokemountaineer.com and Revelstoke Mountaineer Magazine. He's worked in Revelstoke as a journalist and editor for the past 12 years. If you have tips on Revelstoke news, events, outdoor life, community or anything else, contact Aaron at aaron@revelstokemountaineer.com or call/text Aaron at 250-814-8710.