Revelstoke’s pottery scene thrives

A look at local artists living and working their passion.

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A bowl by Kaitlan Murphy of Jumping Creek Pottery. Photo: Chillia Zoll

Revelstoke’s vibrant art scene is a mix of talent, which extends to pottery. There are a number of local potters making a living and doing what they love in our community.

And it goes beyond the professional to the local enthusiast with pottery classes full up with waiting lists at the Revelstoke Visual Arts Centre (although this tends to subside in the summer months when people venture outdoors).

We chatted to two local potters, who are among the talented group in Revelstoke crafting beautiful pieces.

Nancy Geismar

Potter Nancy Geismar. Photo: Emily Kemp/Revelstoke Mountaineer

It was a casual pottery class that stoked a passion in Geismar’s kiln. She helped begin the Revelstoke Potters’ Guild, which has grown to about 40 members, and teaches classes. She says all walks of life enjoy the chance to produce and create.

“I think pottery is a very accessible art form and it’s hands on,” she says. “It meets that need of feeling creative, building something with your hands, and having something functional at the end.”

The artist has previously taught art at Mount Royal University in Calgary. Her pottery skills are self-taught and she learned by taking a few workshops and reading books. “I get my ideas from nature a lot,” she says. “That’s where I like to be. If I’m not in my studio I like to be outside.”

Customers love Geismar’s collection of personalized glossy mugs that depict active figurines such as one snowboarding or hiking.

A variety of mug styles made by local potter Nancy Geismar. Photo: Emily Kemp/Revelstoke Mountaineer

Kaitlan Murphy

Potter Kaitlan Murphy. Photo: Chillia Zoll

You’ve probably driven past Murphy’s mobile gallery with the words Jumping Creek Pottery. She’s been a potter since 19 and is a carpenter by trade, which sees her often work out of town on camp jobs. “I love all the different people you meet there,” she says.

Murphy’s art is stylized with animal stencils overlaid on painted earthenware and she sells hearty cookware on her website where she states, “My pottery embodies stories, dreams, feelings and beliefs that I have garnered on my journeys.”

Some of the designs that potter Kaitlan Murphy creates. Photo: Emily Kemp/Revelstoke Mountaineer

Murphy’s creative process is influenced by her time in nature, a love of food and quality craftsmanship. “I love what I do,” she says. “I work really hard at improving my skill set and learning technical new things.”

This article was first published in the January issue of the free Revelstoke Mountaineer Magazine.