Parks Canada closes Beaver Valley trails and area in Glacier National Park due to wildfire management

A fire ban is still in effect for Mount Revelstoke and Glacier National Parks, despite cooler weather conditions over the weekend. Parks Canada has also closed the Beaver Valley trails and area in Glacier National Park due to ongoing wildfire activity.

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File photo: A fire burns in Glacier National Park. Photo: Aaron Orlando/Revelstoke Mountaineer file photo

Parks Canada has closed the Beaver Valley trails and area in Glacier National Park due to ongoing wildfires.

There are currently two fires in that area which are being actively managed by the Parks Canada fire management team.

“The Prairie Hill fire is visible on the east side of the TransCanada Highway near the Beaver Valley. The approximately 75 ha fire is burning high on the mountain slopes and is being actively managed to keep it from spreading outside identified natural boundaries. The Bald Hills fire is a small fire on an eastern slope about 10 km down the Beaver Valley,” Shelley Bird, public relations and communications officer for Mount Revelstoke and Glacier National Parks wrote in a media statement.

Parks Canada issued a fire ban for Mount Revelstoke and Glacier National Parks on July 12 due to elevated fire danger. Lighting or maintaining fires within park boundaries is currently prohibited.

Weather conditions on Sunday evening (July 16) brought lower temperatures and rain in some areas, helping to slow fire activity in Glacier National Park.

A national Parks Canada fire management team has been dedicated to the Mountain Creek wildfire. This will allow Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national park’s fire management team to focus on managing two smaller active fires in Glacier National Park and to continue monitoring for other fire activity in both parks.

The Mountain Creek fire is still completely within Glacier National Park. Fire suppression actions are focused on slowing fire spread and keeping the fire within specific natural and man-made boundaries. The fire is approximately 1000 Ha in size and does not pose a risk to people or assets at this time.

The safety of the public, our crews, park infrastructure and neighbouring lands is Parks Canada’s top priority. Parks Canada works closely with the BC Wildfire Service to monitor and manage wildfire risk in and around Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks.

”Smoke from the fires and fire suppression activities may be visible from the TransCanada Highway. Depending on weather conditions, smoke may also affect visibility in the transportation corridor through and adjacent to Glacier National Park. Smoke may also affect air quality in areas east of the park including the Town of Golden. Please take this into consideration, especially if you have any existing respiratory concerns,” said Bird.

(You can also read the Mountaineer’s recent story on precautionary steps you can take to protect your health from the smokey skies).

Mount Revelstoke and Glacier National Park’s fire management team has responded to nine wildfires in Glacier National Park since July 10. All of the fires have been the result of lightning strikes during a period of elevated fire danger.

The Mountain Creek fire is in a remote valley at the northeastern end of Glacier National Park. While remote, the valley and the fire can be seen from the East Gate area of the park.

Reports of any new wildfires, illegal campfires or suspicious smoke in Mount Revelstoke and Glacier National Parks can be made to dispatch at 1-877-852-3100.

 

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