Letters of Hope: Zombie apocalypse antidote

'We will have to work together to turn towards the problem, not away from it. We will have to create community, grow food, educate ourselves and support one another.'

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File photo: Adrian Giacca, third from left, is joined by Revelstoke Community Foundation board members and RBC Revelstoke staff at the Dec. 3 announcement of funding support for a tiny home community project in Revelstoke. Photo: Stacie Byrne

This letter was first published in print in the January 2020 issue of Revelstoke Mountaineer Magazine.

How will Revelstoke residents shape our community in the 2020s? For our first issue of the decade, we asked Revelstoke Mountaineer Magazine readers to contribute Letters of Hope for the coming decade. We asked them to express their positive visions for the future of our community. What challenges will we face this decade and how can we thrive in our response? Please enjoy the ideas and visions from our readers expressed in our Letters of Hope. This is the first letter, and we will be publish many more over the next few weeks. 

Zombie apocalypse antidote

Editor,

An exciting conversation I often have that comes with the discussion on climate change is: what will happen in a natural disaster, system collapse or an impending apocalyptic event?

It’s a fascinating fantasy that’s often supported by the great number of disaster, pandemic and zombie movies. Imagining the life we would have to live in this rugged post-apocalyptic world invigorates the desire for self-sufficiency and individualism. Life will be challenging and tasks will be hard, but we imagine that our focus will be clear, decisions will be easy and life would be simpler. These movies often portray these violent clans or rogue wanderers. The reality is that we will not be by ourselves and avoiding people we don’t trust.

Humans have evolved to be the most dominant species on our planet because of our capabilities to communicate and cooperate. We’ve developed attributes of compassion, generosity and altruism to survive in the direst of situations. The hope I have for the future lies with each one of us to practice kindness and fairness, to cooperate and compromise. We will have to work together to turn towards the problem, not away from it. We will have to create community, grow food, educate ourselves and support one another.

The reason I’ve chosen to call Revelstoke home is because of our strong sense of community. All around us are people who care and contribute. We can make our home and the world a better place by fully participating in the health and well-being of us all.

Adrian Giacca, Revelstoke