CSISS: Illegal dumping spreads invasive species

The Columbia Shuswap Invasive Species Society (CSISS) is encouraging Revelstoke residents to double-bag and dispose of invasive species at a designated area at the local landfill.

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The Columbia Shuswap Invasive Species Society’s Executive Director, Robyn Hooper, standing beside newly created signage found at landfills and transfer stations across the region.

The Columbia Shuswap Invasive Species Society (CSISS) is encouraging Revelstoke residents to double bag and dispose of invasive species at a designated area at the local landfill rather than illegally dumping, composting, or burying the material at home.

Robyn Hooper of CSISS says new sites have been discovered by the Columbia Shuswap Invasive Species Society (CSISS) where yard waste dumping has led to invasive plant infestations — both within regional landfills and at illegal dumping sites.

Compost or yard waste zones are a major concern for invasive plant infestations, as some invasive plants can re-sprout from small stem or root fragments. If compost material has the potential to later be used and distributed, it could cause major issues if it has been contaminated with invasive plant material and seeds. The invasive plant Knotweed is one of the biggest concerns as it easily spreads from tiny fragments of its root and stem cuttings, and it has been spotted growing at a few sites in landfills, including near yard waste piles.

“Knotweed should not be composted or put in yard waste, but rather buried in the landfill to reduce risk of spread” says CSISS Executive Director Robyn Hooper, “We encourage all landowners to contact CSISS regarding proper knotweed management.

“Invasive plant infestations may result from plant parts that re-sprout or seeds that spread from yard waste dumping,” says CSISS Executive Director Robyn Hooper, “The key is prevention and ensuring that invasive plants are double bagged, and deeply buried at the landfill — not put into any yard waste or compost systems, or illegally dumped.”

CSISS recommends that when disposing of an invasive plants, they should be double bagged and sealed, then carefully transported so plant material does not spread. Invasive plants should be brought to a landfill or transfer station to the designated disposal site for deep burial. Do not compost invasive plants or put in yard waste piles. For a list of invasive plants designated for deep burial please visit: http://columbiashuswapinvasives.org/noxious-weed-list-for-the-columbia-shuswap/

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